Archive for March, 2010

Spanish Nouns: Tax

Thursday, March 18th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Nouns: Taxi,  Sándwich,  Costo,  Adulto,  Reservación,  Agente,  Hotel,  Aeroplano,  Aerolínea,  Distancia

Pronunciation: Tah-xee,  Sahnd-weech,  Kohs-toh, Ah-dool-toh,  Ray-sayr-vah-seeohn,  Ah.hayn-tay,  oh-tayl,  Ahay-roh-plah-noh,  Ahey-roh-lee-naya,  Dees-tahn.seeah

Translation: Taxi,  Sandwich,  Cost,  Adult,  Reservation,  Agent,  Hotel,  Airplane,  Airline,  Distance

Function: Nouns

Intro :

These all are very useful Spanish nouns for the airport that write and sound pretty much the same in English. Also, maybe you noticed that the ending “tion” in “Reservation” gets slightly changed to “ción”. This is a useful thing to remember: Most words ending in “tion” in English end in “ción” in Spanish.

Detail:

You can also see that “Distance” is translated as “Distancia”. The ending “-nce” is often mapped to “-ncia”; as in “assistance” and “asistencia”. You should also keep this in mind, especially while in Latin- America or Spain.

Example:

¿Me puede recomendar un hotel?

Translation:

Can you recommend me a hotel?

Spanish Verbs: Transportar

Monday, March 15th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish verbsVerbs: Transportar, Indicar, Recomendar, Obtener, Atender, Recibir, Vender, Verificar, Auxiliar

Pronunciation: Trahns-pohr-tahr, Een-dee-kahr, Ray-koh-mayn-dahr, Ohb-tay-nayr, Ah-tayn-dayr, Ray-see-beer, Bayn-dayr, Bay-ree-fee-kahr, Ahoo-xee-lee-ahr

Translation: Transport, Indicate, Recommend, Obtain, Attend, Receive, Vend, Verify, Auxiliary

Function: Verbs

Intro :

If all the Spanish you know are a few nouns and you’ll be landing soon in Latin America or Spain, these are the very first 9 verbs you should learn, if you don’t want to be reduced to sign language when asking for something. These all mean (and are written) almost the same in English, so you are already familiar with them.

Detail:

You can easily construct many useful sentences for the airport with them if you start with ‘Me puede”, as in: ‘¿Me puede transportar a Teotihuacán?’ [Can you transport me to Teotihuacan?]. This ‘me puede’ is very convenient because the following verb never changes. The result is not perfect Spanish -or English- but locals will understand you (you would still need to know some nouns to end these requests)

Example:

¿Me puede auxiliar a recibir mi equipaje?

Translation:

Can you help (serving as an auxiliary) me receiving my luggage?

Spanish Noun: Magnate, milmillonario

Saturday, March 13th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Magnate, milmillonario

Pronunciation: Mahg-nahn-tay, meel-mee-yoh-nah-reeoh

Translation: Magnate, billionaire

Function: Nouns

There are gradations is Spanish too for the very rich, so magnate doesn’t change: ‘magnate’, a billionaire is a ‘milmillonario’ (still to be widely accepted), a multi-millionaire is a ‘multimillonario’ and a millionaire a ‘millonario’

‘Milenario’ has nothing to do with money, but with time: it means “millennial”.

Example:

Ahora es un millonaria… antes de 2007 era multimillonaria

Translation:

She is now a millionaire… before 2007 she was a multimillionaire

Spanish Nouns: Los dedos

Thursday, March 11th, 2010 | Permalink

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Spanish Nouns: Los dedos

Pronunciation: Lohs day-dohs

Translation: The fingers

Function: Nouns

Fingers in Spanish have special names too: the thumb is ‘el pulgar’, the index is ‘el índice´, the middle is ‘el cordial’ [related to the heart], the ring is the ‘anular’ [for the 'anillo'] the little finger is the ‘meñique’ or ‘auricular’ [because some people use it for ear (áurícula’) cleaning]

There are informal names too, as ‘el dedo gordo’ [the fat finger] for the thumb, and ‘el dedo chiquito’ [the little finger] for the little one.

Example:

Se fracturó su meñique

Translation:

He fractured his little finger

Spanish Adverb: Antaño

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Adverb: Antaño

Pronunciation: Ahn-tah-nyoh

Translation: Times gone

Function: Adverb

‘Antaño’ is a very old word about very old times, and gives Spanish sentences the flavor of times gone past: ‘Ya no hacen vinos como los de antaño’ [they don´t make wines as in the old times] If you find it resembles the word ‘año’ [year], you are right, they are related: ‘antaño’ comes from ‘ante-’ [before -] and ‘año’ [year]

‘Como en antaño’ is very much in use, but the ‘en’ is out of place: ‘como antaño’ (‘como antes’) is the right way to use this word.

Example:

Las mujeres de antaño no podían estudiar en las universidades.

Translation:

In the old times, women couldn´t study in universities.

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Spanish Adjective: Bien

Sunday, March 7th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Adjective: Bien

Pronunciation: Bee-ayn

Translation: Very

Function: Adjective

‘Bien’ [good] has a second meaning: [very] and it is very much alive in the Spanish language. You can find in food praising ‘está bien rico’ [it is very tasty] or -for example- in the time of day: ‘ya es bien tarde’ [it is very late already]

This adjective works very much like the word “well”, but it has to appear before the adjective to function as “very” -and praising something too-

Example:

Es un muchacho bien malo

Translation:

He is a very bad boy

Spanish Noun: Sabio

Friday, March 5th, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Sabio

Translation: Wise and educated

Function: Noun

One who has both talent and knowledge, and also gets to produce new ideas is known in Spanish as ‘sabio’. Sometimes the word is mistakenly used as ‘erudito’ [erudite], but this last word means knowing many things about many topics, not necessarily related with one another.

Also, if you get to know about somebody who knows a great deal about one subject, but doesn´t produce that many new ideas, you can call him/her ‘docto’ [taught]

Example:

No solo era erudita sino sabia también

Translation:

Not only did she was an erudite, but a wise woman as well

Spanish Noun: Dolencia

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Dolencia

Pronunciation: Doh-layn-ceeah

Translation: Ailment

Function: Noun

‘Dolencia’ comes from Spanish ‘dolor’ [pain] and it is used frequently instead of ‘enfermedad’ [sickness]. In case it comes across, you should find out whether or not a pain is involved.

Should pain be out of the picture, you must take it as ‘ sickness’, not as a suffering pain.

Example:

Esa dolencia tiene más de un mes con él

Translation:

He has had that ailment for more than a month

Spanish Noun: Moral

Monday, March 1st, 2010 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Moral

Pronunciation: Moh-rahl

Translation: Moral

Function: Noun

In Spanish, this word has a clear different meaning than ‘ética’ [ethics], as ´moral’ refers to a way to achieve the ethical principles. The first is about practice and the second about theory.

Furthermore; ‘Moral’ is taken in Spanish as a series of ‘modos’ [ways] and ´etica’ as a series of principles.

Example:

Ética

Translation:

Ethics

 

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