Archive for the Uncategorized Category

Spanish Noun: Joven, Señorita (tratamiento)

Friday, October 23rd, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Joven, Señorita (tratamiento)

Pronunciation: Hoj-bayn

Translation: <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:ES;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> Waiter, Maid (treatment)

Function: Noun

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:ES;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> When trying to get an attendant´s attention, using his or her job’s name could be considered impolite. Usage in most of Spain and Latin-America calls for a general name to be used instead, such as ‘señor’ or ‘señora’, instead of ‘mesero’ or ‘mesera’ [waiter] or any other attendant job name.

<!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:ES;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> If the attendant is a young man or woman, then you can also use ‘joven’ [young man] for a male, or ‘señorita’ [miss], for a female (just remember never to call a male attendant with archaic ‘señorito’, as it is only used these days in a pejorative sense)

Example: <!– /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:”Cambria Math”; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1107304683 0 0 159 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-1610611985 1073750139 0 0 159 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:”"; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ansi-language:ES;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; font-size:10.0pt; mso-ansi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-bidi-font-size:10.0pt; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;} @page Section1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.Section1 {page:Section1;} –> ¡Señorita!

Translation: Maid!

Spanish Noun: Puerto, puerta

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Noun :P uerto, puerta

Pronunciation:pooayhr-toh, pooayr-tah

Translation:Port, door

Function:noun

Be ware of look-a-like’s in Spanish, sometimes they don’t mean the same thing: ‘puerto’ and ‘puerta’ may seem the same thing, only different in gender, but…
the first means «a place where ships load or unload» and the second is a «movable structure at the entrance of a room». There are other instances, as ”paja’ [straw] and ‘paje’ [page]

Example:Libro, libra

Translation:Book, pound

Spanish Agreement: Concordancia, Las matemáticas y el cálculo son muy importantes

Saturday, September 12th, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Agreement: Concordancia: Las matemáticas y el cálculo son muy importantes

Pronunciation:Cohn-cohr-dahn-ceeah

Translation:Mathematics and calculus are very important

Function:Agreement

Agreement in Spanish can turn very tricky when talking about several subjects. Which one to follow if one is masculine and the other feminine? How about when one is in singular and the other ones in plural?

The rule of thumb: put the masculine at the end and use the verb plural form, as above.

Example:Me interesan la cultura y el arte españoles.

Translation:I am interested in the Spanish culture and art

Spanish Auxiliary verb:Deben de

Thursday, September 10th, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Auxiliary verb:Deben de

Pronunciation:Day-bayn day

Translation:Have to

Function:Auxiliary verb

Spanish calls for ‘de’ to be added when verb ‘Deber’ is used as an auxiliary to other verbs, as in ‘Usted debe de escuchar antes de hablar’ [You have to listen before you talk].

On the other part, you shouldn’t add ‘de’ when it is not necessary.

Example:Debe de poner atención

Translation:You must pay attention

Spanish Ordinals: 1°, 2ª

Sunday, September 6th, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Ordinals:1°, 2ª  

Pronunciation:Pree-may-roh, say-goon-doh

Translation:1st, 2nd…

Function:Ordinals

Spanish ordinals are rather complex . For instance: I came in 115th place means: ‘Llegué en centésimo décimo quinto lugar’. Ordinals en English are clearly much more easier.

To get around in writing, you can always use an ‘o’ (for a masculine) or an ‘a’ (for a feminine) depending on what the context is. These vowels follow the cardinal as in: ‘el 4o lugar’ [in 4th place] and 1a vez [1st time]. Of course, when talking, you can always use ‘avo’ after the 20th, as in ‘treintavo’ [30th]

Example:Ganamos los lugares 10° y 11°

Translation:We won the 10th and 11th places

Spanish Verb: Echar

Thursday, September 3rd, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Noun:Echar

Pronunciation:Ay-chahr

Translation:Throw

Function:verb

‘Echar’ is very useful as a ‘wild card’, so you can use it with many different meanings, as in: ‘échame la pelota’ [thrown me the ball], ‘échate una canción’ [play a song], ‘no me eches la culpa’ [don't put the blame on me]

Usage is done when something is thrown physically or as a figura of speech. Just don´t put an ‘h’ at the beginning, because ‘hecho’ is a noun -something done even by locals sometimes-

Example:échale mas agua

Translation:add more water

Spanish Preposition:Desde

Tuesday, August 25th, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Noun:Desde  

Pronunciation:Days-day

Translation:From

Function:Preposition

Remember ‘Desde’ [From] and ‘hasta’ [to] often work in pairs when referring to an origin and destination.

Forgetting on doing so would turn your expression obscure. ‘Desde’ [Ever since] also work in pair with ‘ya’ [no longer], as in: ‘Desde que ganó la lotería ya no viene por aquí’ [Ever since he won the lottery, he comes no longer]

Example:Desde Los Ángeles hasta Can-Cun

Translation:From Los Angeles to Can-Cun

Spanish Noun:Apócopes: Tele, refri, auto, cine

Saturday, August 22nd, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish Noun: Apócopes: Tele, refri, auto, cine

Pronunciation:Tay-lay, ray-phree, ahoo-toh, cee-nay

Translation:tv, fridge, auto, theater

Function:noun

Apócopes’ [apocopes] in Spanish are as common as in the English language. So very long daily words are shortened, i.e.: ‘tele’ [tv], ‘refri’ [fridge], ‘auto’ [auto] and ‘cine’ [theater] are preferred in daily talk.

As in English, you should use them only in informal settings. ‘Cine’ is short of ‘cinematógrafo’, now considered archaic; even in writing, ‘cine’ is used more often than the whole word.

Example:Lo primero que todos los recién casados quieren tener después de la casa es refri, tele y auto.

Translation:First thing just married want to have after the house, is fridge, TV and car.

Short for: Endocrino…

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009 | Permalink

Spanish:  Endocrino…

Pronunciation: Ayn-doh-kree-noh

Translation: Endocrinologist

Function: Short for

Don’t be confused when you hear Spanish speakers medical talk full of truncated words when referring to specialties, as in ‘endocrino’: short for ‘endocrinólogo’ [endocrinologist]. This apocopes are often used simply to save time or just because the speaker doesn´t really know the final part.

In most of the instances that missing part is ‘-logo’ [-logist], as in ‘cardio’ [for cardiologist], ‘procto’ [for proctologist]. Sometimes the missing part is huge, as in ‘otorrino’, for otorhinolaryngologist!

Example: Endocrino

Translation: Endocrinologist

 

April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930